Introducing: Patrick Hofmeister (aka WäDL)...

Patrick is a self-taught multimedia artist, born and raised in San Jose, California. Homeless and undirected at the age of 20, Patrick found his life-path changing direction when he discovered painting while living at the Bill Wilson Center – Transitional Housing Program. His house-monitor and mentor Marcus Are encouraged Patrick to focus his creative energies and pursue his passion for painting. Patrick’s enthusiasm for art is evident in all aspects of his life now and he credits Marcus, George Rivera and his mother, with his success in becoming a professional artist. Where there once was an aimless and misguided teenager, there is now a flourishing mural artist and sculptor, using his acrylics and spray paint to visually captivate his audience. And Patrick’s artwork is mesmerizing, grabbing the viewer’s interest as layer-upon-eye-catching-layer of vibrant detail is uncovered.  “I want the viewer to be as engaged in the viewing of my work as the work engages me in the moment I create it.” We spoke with Patrick at the Triton Museum of Art in Santa Clara, where his artwork is now showcased with three other artists in the Spiral: Art of the Street Exhibit. His collection of canvasses speaks of metamorphosis through organic imagery of moths, flies, darkness and light. When did you know that you wanted to be an artist? Patrick: I think it was when I was in 5th Grade. I was inspired by comic book art and a next-door neighbor who was an artist. Can you tell us what your chosen media is and why you like it best? Patrick: I mostly use acrylics. It’s what I have the most experience with. I like that I can work quickly with it and don’t have to wait hours for it to dry. What was...

Surrealism Oct06

Surrealism

In light of this week’s featured artist, I thought I’d write a brief summary on Surrealism, to help give you some background on his painting style. What began in the late 1910s to early 20s as an automatic writing style, Surrealism became an international movement encompassing not only writing, but all intellectual, political and artistic styles. Using Freud’s free association, all aspects of “The Arts” entered the realm of the inner psyche, casting off society’s tradition and creating shocking and unpredicted imagery. With compositions that contained no logic, odd creatures from everyday objects, and the use of surprising juxtaposition and non sequitur, Surreal artists allowed their unconscious minds free-reign to create. Former Dadaists such as Max Ernst, André Masson, and Man Ray were the first to adopt this free-form style of painting, followed closely by René Magritte, Salvador Dali, and Yves Tanguy. Probably the most recognizable piece of Surrealist art is Dali’s “The Persistence of Memory” with it’s sandy beach scene of melting pocket watches, and unconscious symbol of the relativity of time and space. Spawned from the Dadaist, Surrealist art emphasized positive expression. According to Andre Breton, a spokesperson for the movement, poet and publisher of “The Surrealist Manifesto”, Surrealism was a way to tie together the conscious and unconscious, so that fantasy or the dream world would be connected to the everyday rational world in “an absolute reality, a surreality.” As Surrealist art gained momentum, two separate groups began to evolve. The Automatists, a group more focused on feeling and less on analytical, believed images should not be burdened by “meaning”. The Veristic Surrealists however, believed academic discipline and form was the way to represent the subconscious,  to capture the images that if unrecorded, would easily slip away. They thought that by...