Los Angeles City With Art Nov16

Los Angeles City With Art...

There are some cities in the world that just declare their artistic nature for all to see and Los Angeles is one of those cities. The sprawling city is home to several museums including the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA). There are museums in satellite regions of LA worth visiting as well, including San Marino’s Huntington Library, Art Collection and Gardens and Malibu’s branch of the Getty called The Getty Villa which is a structure created to resemble a first century Roman villa located in Herculaneum, Italy. While traditionally viewed as the home of Tinsel Town, or Hollywood, we often tend to view Los Angeles first as home to the U.S. media empire. This is not untrue, but the city surprises us by also being home to so many museums with such extensive programs of art. And the museums house several kinds of art including sculpture and landscaping. Really it seems impossible to visit the Getty in less than a day. In fact, it nearly requires two or three trips to see everything on the campus. And it’s the same with the Huntington Library, particularly if you are fond of old books, letters, as well as gardens and art. History is strongly represented by the Getty, the Huntington and The Getty Villa. At the Huntington Library out in nearby San Marino, history is more immediate as visitors are encouraged to peruse letters, paintings and architecture from a time when the southwest United States was mostly orchard fields and Georgian mansions. The J. Paul Getty Museum located in the hills that divide Los Angeles from San Fernando Valley covers a thorough and diverse range of historical periods...

Supporting the Arts from the Ground Up...

“The future belongs to young people with an education and the imagination to create.” –President Barack Obama The news is full of stories of hard economic times causing funding cuts in arts education. More than a few schools have slashed support of the arts; some have eliminated them entirely. For artists this is alarming, for most others it’s a non-issue. Why should we spend our sparse education funding on painting and music and writing? Our math scores trail many other developed countries. Many students leave school barely able to read and write at a first grade level. Artists know the answer to this question. The arts exercise the mind in ways that the mere ingesting and regurgitating of facts can never do. Unfortunately, the ones who make the decisions on where to spend the money rarely see it that way. It is our responsibility to educate them, so they will educate our children. When people talk about supporting a school’s football team, they don’t mean for people to sit around and hope that the school will come up with the funds to keep it going. They’re talking about putting butts in the seats. They’re talking about an enthusiastic demonstration of support and good will. Why should we approach support of arts education any differently? How successful would a football program be if the only people who showed up for games were the mothers and fathers of the players? And yet, when a school music ensemble has a concert, or the theater department is presenting a play, they’re lucky to get as many people in the audience as they have on the stage. One big problem that arts programs have is, frankly, that the teachers rarely have the time or know-how to promote their programs...