Musebreak: A Vision

When I contemplated the idea for Musebreak, I envisioned an online magazine dedicated to bringing the world information about The Arts. A place where everyday people could take a break from their everyday world and learn about the muse that inspires us all. What we deal with as artists, where we come up with our creative ideas, where our challenges lie. I believe that as creatives, we are obligated to explain our choices and talk about what drives us to do what we do, so we can break down the barriers holding us in an awe-inspired isolation; an enigma to the rest of the world. I envisioned Musebreak as an outlet for this purpose; a way to share creativity to those who have not found theirs. Most creatives tend to hang with other creatives, because they share a common bond and draw inspiration from the symbiotic relationship. They feel understood. There’s no need to explain behaviors that don’t necessarily conform to the norm. Unfortunately, that leaves the rest of the world shaking their heads and wondering why this type of person does what they do. My vision for Musebreak would enlighten those not privy to the artistic world—I had no idea what a challenge this would be. Being 100% volunteer, getting writers to volunteer their time has been a struggle. It is here that I have to sing the praises to the writers who have chosen to help me in this quest. Their weekly contributions are done without any type of feedback or pay. The only thing I can offer is to promote whatever artistic venture they are involved in and a space to write, free of strict deadlines or strict editorial constraints. I also feel the need to apologize for my attempts at...

Introducing: Paul Taylor...

Paul Taylor has the distinction of being one of a shallow handful of webcomic artists to have made the transition to the ranks of professionals. His comic, Wapsi Square, first appeared on September 9th, 2001, and has been a mainstay of the webcomic world ever since. Originally starring a young Hispanic woman named Monica and her friend Amanda, it was a slice of life gag strip. In the twelve years since its inception, it has become a supernatural thriller with a huge cast, but still maintains the wit that made it popular from the outset. Today, Mr. Taylor produces five original strips every week, sells original strip artwork and prints on eBay, and his fourth collection In the Shadow of Doubt has just become available as a paperback or ebook purchase. We’d like to thank Mr. Taylor for taking time out from his self-imposed busy schedule to answer a few questions for us at Musebreak. First of all, tell us about the origin of Wapsi Square. What was your motivation for starting a webcomic? Why this one? Paul Taylor:  Mostly, I needed an outlet for my overactive imagination. Also, I wanted a venue that I could use to help break stereotypes and give characters, who are normally sidelined in more mainstream stories, a front-and-center voice. The muse for this story was a friend of mine who was short, skinny, and very busty. She fit the bimbo bombshell (other than being 4‘10“), and most importantly, she was a super smart smarty-pants and very nerdy. And as quiet and socially awkward as she was, she had the fiery Latina temper and could put people in their place quite eloquently. I just knew this was a gal that needed a wider voice.   Anyone who approaches your...

Introducing: FB Kelly...

F.B. Kelly is the pen name under which this married couple and writing team work their magic.  The pair live in Seattle, Washington.  With each partner published individually before they joined forces, they found even more pleasure in working together on crafting stories of magic, whimsy and romance. We spoke with this pair about how they write together and why: How long have you both been writing? Ben:  I think I seriously started dabbling with writing stories since high school.  I was a highly imaginative child and I always told myself stories but it was in high school that I started writing them down. Fiona:  I think I was telling stories at a very young age, usually walking around and enacting them in the back yard.  I was writing a full-fledged ‘novel’ about a space station at the age of nine.  I’m sure it was at least ten pages long.   When did you decide to co-write? Fiona:  We’ve been co-writers for nine years now.  It just sort of happened on a whim one day. Ben:  It started by accident really. Fiona:  But we realized it was really funny and entertaining so we kept doing it.  And then we got married which was pretty serious and then we ended up wondering what to do about our first anniversary present. Ben:  She told me it was paper for year one. Fiona:  So I asked him, ‘You know we have all these stories that we’ve told over the years.  Why don’t we pick the one that seems the most like us and actually put it into print?’ Ben: Having studied design and book layout, I thought ‘Why not?’ It’s something we could do ourselves and I’d discovered lulu.com in art school, so I knew where to...